Victoria Bowring
Location: Orlando, Florida, United States
Traditions: Buddhism, Universal Ethics
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"Not all those who wander are lost." J.R.R. Tolkien

What I'm About

I am evolving daily. Learning and listening along the way. My passion is to connect with people and help to make my world a better place for having been here. My world consists of those closest to me and those who I meet everyday...and perhaps beyond... more
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PERCEPTION
What do we miss as we rush through life?
THE SITUATIONIn Washington D.C., at a Metro Station, on a cold January morning in 2007, a man with a violin played six Bach pieces for about forty-five minutes. During that time, over 1000 people went through the station, most on their way to work. After about three minutes, a middle-aged man noticed that there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds, and then he hurried on to meet his schedule. After 4 minutes: The violinist received his first dollar. A woman threw money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk. At 6 minutes: A young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again. At 10 minutes:A 3-year old boy stopped, but his mother tugged him along hurriedly. The kid stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head the whole time. This action was repeated by several other children, but every parent - without exception - forced their children to move on quickly.For 45 minutes:The musician played continuously. Of 1097 people who walked by, only seven stopped and listened for a short while. Twenty more gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace. The man collected a total of $32.17  He finished playing and silence took over. No one noticed and no one applauded. There was no recognition at all.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars. Two days before, Joshua Bell sold-out a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100 each to sit and listen to him play the same music.This is a true story. Joshua Bell, playing incognito in the D.C. Metro Station, was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people's priorities.In a common-place environment, at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty? If so, do we stop to appreciate it?Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made . . . How many other things are we missing as we rush through life?

PERCEPTION

THE SITUATIONIn Washington D.C., at a Metro Station, on a cold January morning in 2007, a man with a violin played six Bach pieces for about forty-five minutes. During that time, over 1000 people went through the station, most on their way to work. After about three minutes, a middle-aged man noticed that there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds, and then he hurried on to meet his schedule. After 4 minutes: The violinist received his first dollar. A woman threw money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk. At 6 minutes: A young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again. At 10 minutes:A 3-year old boy stopped, but his mother tugged him along hurriedly. The kid stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head the whole time. This action was repeated by several other children, but every parent - without exception - forced their children to move on quickly.For 45 minutes:The musician played continuously. Of 1097 people who walked by, only seven stopped and listened for a short while. Twenty more gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace. The man collected a total of $32.17  He finished playing and silence took over. No one noticed and no one applauded. There was no recognition at all.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars. Two days before, Joshua Bell sold-out a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100 each to sit and listen to him play the same music.This is a true story. Joshua Bell, playing incognito in the D.C. Metro Station, was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people's priorities.In a common-place environment, at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty? If so, do we stop to appreciate it?Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made . . . How many other things are we missing as we rush through life?

Source

Source type: Periodical
viral email paraphrased from The Washington Post
Page W10
Pearls before Breakfast
by Gene Weingarten
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/video/2007/04/09/VI2007040900536.html
Contribution #4834

Source (click to close)

Source type: Periodical
viral email paraphrased from The Washington Post
Page W10
Pearls before Breakfast
by Gene Weingarten
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/video/2007/04/09/VI2007040900536.html
Contribution #4834


Meeting the Dalai Lama
As usual when the Dalai Lama meets Westerners, an English-speaking Tibetan interpreter is present to help clarify words or meanings. The Dalai Lama's English, like his Tibetan, rises and falls in a wide range of expressive tones, highlighted by an infectious sense of humor. His voice is calm and penetrating. Scholars say he speaks with incomparable eloquence in the Tibetan language. He delivers Buddhist teachings in his native tongue but speaks English when conversing generally. Prominent cheekbones meet the fine network of creases at his shining, penetrating eyes, as he listens and nods and smiles encouragingly. His unusually glowing skin accentuates a single, inquisitive, v-shaped line that runs the length of his high forehead. Regardless of the topic, brief words of practical advice and grounded viewpoint are woven into a conversation that begins and ends with your own initiative. His Holiness the Dalai Lama, believed to be an incarnation of the Buddha of Compassion, is not interested in gaining converts or becoming embroiled in passionate debate. He is simply there for you, to become engaged in a warm, personal exchange. You notice, fleetingly, that the Dalai Lama's hands are exquisite. His long, slender fingers close gently around each other as he earnestly listens to you. Suddenly his hands open wide, then pull together in a hollow clap as he breaks forth into laughter. It is true that His Holiness does love to laugh. Whether in rippling giggles or a clear open gale, his sense of joy pervades his entire being. While he may roar briefly in response to something you have said, never do you feel ridiculed, for this great monk is laughing beyond irony or personal psychology. And his outburst is generally accompanied by a reassuring comment which clarifies the profound depth of his humor. His is an unaffected, unselfconscious mirth. (Translation into English by Karin Murad)

Meeting the Dalai Lama

As usual when the Dalai Lama meets Westerners, an English-speaking Tibetan interpreter is present to help clarify words or meanings. The Dalai Lama's English, like his Tibetan, rises and falls in a wide range of expressive tones, highlighted by an infectious sense of humor. His voice is calm and penetrating. Scholars say he speaks with incomparable eloquence in the Tibetan language. He delivers Buddhist teachings in his native tongue but speaks English when conversing generally. Prominent cheekbones meet the fine network of creases at his shining, penetrating eyes, as he listens and nods and smiles encouragingly. His unusually glowing skin accentuates a single, inquisitive, v-shaped line that runs the length of his high forehead. Regardless of the topic, brief words of practical advice and grounded viewpoint are woven into a conversation that begins and ends with your own initiative. His Holiness the Dalai Lama, believed to be an incarnation of the Buddha of Compassion, is not interested in gaining converts or becoming embroiled in passionate debate. He is simply there for you, to become engaged in a warm, personal exchange. You notice, fleetingly, that the Dalai Lama's hands are exquisite. His long, slender fingers close gently around each other as he earnestly listens to you. Suddenly his hands open wide, then pull together in a hollow clap as he breaks forth into laughter. It is true that His Holiness does love to laugh. Whether in rippling giggles or a clear open gale, his sense of joy pervades his entire being. While he may roar briefly in response to something you have said, never do you feel ridiculed, for this great monk is laughing beyond irony or personal psychology. And his outburst is generally accompanied by a reassuring comment which clarifies the profound depth of his humor. His is an unaffected, unselfconscious mirth. (Translation into English by Karin Murad)

Source

Source type: Website
Nanci Rose
Contribution #516

Source (click to close)

Source type: Website
Nanci Rose
Contribution #516